PBIS Handbook

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the PBIS Handbook!


Koontz Intermediate School

Compassionate PBIS

Positive Behavioral Intervention and Support Handbook


LEAD

Leadership

Empathy

Accountability

Determination




Table of Contents ………………………………………………………....... 2

Background Information

Introductory Staff Letter from the PBIS Team …………………………... 3

Guiding Principles (What is PBIS?)........................................................... 4 - 5

Behavioral Expectations

Behavior Expectations …………………………………………………… 5-6

Behavioral Matrix Link ………………………………………………….. 6

Implementation Plan

Implementation Plan.................................................................................... 6

Koontz Prodecure Manual Link .................................................................. 6

20 Day Plan Link......................................................................................... 6

Staff Responsibilities.................................................................................. 6

Teaching Social/behavioral skills/ Expectations Tip Sheet......................... 7-8

Roles for non-certified staff………………………………………………. 8

Incentive Plans

Tickets ………………………………………………………………....…9

Leader Card………………………………………………………………....9

Discipline Information

PBIS Tiered Discipline Flow Chart.................................................................10

References/Additional Resources…………………………….…………………10

Acknowledgments …………………………………………………….…………..11












Dear Koontz Intermediate Staff,


We are excited to begin our 5th year as a Positive Behavior Interventions and Support (PBIS) school. Behavior and school climate is a priority at Koontz Intermediate School and is one of the primary focuses of our district. In this packet you’ll find information about our school-wide climate and discipline plan.

What is PBIS? Put simply, it is a proactive approach to school-wide discipline. This initiative is meant to reinforce the positive behaviors of students doing what is expected of them as well as supporting students who need extra assistance to reach the school wide expectations of Leadership, Empathy, Accountability and Determination.

Our goals this year are to have 100% of staff members enforcing PBIS principles, and to reduce our office referrals by 5%.  PBIS has many years of research supporting its approach to behavior management and behavior modeling. One of the benefits of implementing PBIS is an increase in the amount of instructional time our students receive because staff members don’t have to address behavioral issues. As a staff, we’re consistently defining, teaching, reinforcing, and monitoring positive behaviors.

Within your packet you will find:

The LEAD Behavioral Expectations

PBIS Matrix

Discipline Procedures and Flow Chart

Amie Dean Tool Kit for Behavior Management

Office Referral Procedures

PBIS Individual Incentive Programs

PBIS Class-Wide Incentive Programs

PBIS Staff Incentive Programs

PBIS Special Acknowledgements


PBIS is truly a win-win program for all involved. Our expectation is that we keep the excitement going to truly impact

student achievement through the use of Positive Behavior Support.


Thank you,

Positive Behavior Intervention and Support 2018-19 Team


Guiding Principles

What is Positive Behavior Support?

Positive Behavioral Intervention and Support (PBIS) is a general term that refers to the application of positive interventions and system changes to achieve socially important behavior change.  PBIS was developed initially as an alternative to aversive interventions used for students with significant disabilities who engaged in extreme forms of self-injury and aggression.


More recently, the technology has been applied successfully with a wide range of students, in a wide range of contexts, and extended from an intervention approach for individual students to an intervention approach for entire schools.


The focus is on creating and sustaining school environments that improve lifestyle results (personal, health, social, academic, work, etc.) for all students by making problem behavior less effective, efficient, and relevant, while making desired behavior more functional. In addition, the use of culturally appropriate interventions is emphasized.


What is the Purpose of PBIS?

The purpose is to establish a comprehensive, data-driven system that gives schools the capability of identifying and treating building-wide behavior problems using empirically supported Technology (School Wide Information Systems (SWIS)). (Sugai & Horner, 2001).


Components of School-Wide Positive Behavior Support

Foundation for Collaboration

Build Faculty Involvement

Identify Problems

Brainstorm & Select Strategies

Implement Program

Monitor, Evaluate, & Modify

Data-driven Decision Making


What is School-Wide Support?

Procedures and processes intended for all students, staff, and settings

Includes a building-wide team, which oversees…

• Development

• Implementation

• Modification

• Evaluation activities


What systems are problematic?

For PBIS to be successful, we need to look at our referrals by:

– Problem behavior?

– Location?

– Time of day?

– Student?


Are there many students receiving referrals or only a small number of students with many referrals?

Data should assist with: Parent meetings, development of IEP’s, student interventions, evaluation, and professional development.


To look at behavior data we use the DMS (Data Management System) & Educator’s Handbook

Both are web-based information systems used for gathering, entering, summarizing, & reporting using minor incidents and office referral information.

Koontz DMS

Educator's Handbook Login


It is only useful if behavior referrals are completed efficiently and consistently. This is an expectation of every staff member to use the Better Choices Sheets as pre-referral documentation. Then use the Minor and/or  Office referrals within Educator’s Handbook, which is Buncombe County’s adopted behavioral management system.


The Behavior Expectations Matrix

We have created a behavior expectation Matrix that should govern all areas of the school. The language on the matrix is important. By using the language on the matrix, students will hear consistent vocabulary from PBIS and The Leader in Me.   This consistency will allow students to be familiar and understand the expectations for their behavior in all school settings.


Our behavioral expectations are that students will demonstrate:  LEAD.

Leadership

Empathy

Accountability

Determination

When you look at the Matrix (link below) you will see how we have defined Leadership, Empathy, Accountability and Determination in all school settings.  These expectations are the foundation for our PBIS plan.


Behavioral Matrix


Implementation Plan

This plan is designed to implement the school-wide positive behavior support system in the most efficient manner at Koontz Intermediate School. Each topic is clearly defined and support materials are provided. Teaching responsibilities are assigned to the most appropriate school staff members. Our specific goals are as follows:


  1. Teach classroom and schoolwide procedures in the Koontz Procedure Manual

  2. Teach classroom expectations and school universal expectations with the 20 Day Plan

  3. Introduce behavior expectations and provide specific behavior examples for each expectation (Leadership, Empathy, Accountability and Determination)

  4. Issue “Tickets” to students who are modeling the LEAD expectations

  5. Implement LEAD Card Incentive System

  6. Use Behavior Level System

  7. Communicate issues with parents

  8. Document your behavioral interventions using our School Forms

  9. Celebrate student achievement through school-wide socials and classroom incentive programs




PBIS Staff Responsibilities

  • Teach behavior expectations and social/behavioral skills with integrity

  • Encourage and provide incentives for positive behavior (positive notes/calls home, tickets,  Incentives, etc.)

  • Follow Behavior Flow Chart and complete Parent Referral or Office Referral Forms

  • Use student, classroom, and school-wide data to make classroom and team decisions

  • Model expected behavior for students and provide classroom incentives

  • Work within grade-level teams to problem solves behavior issues

  • Keep administration informed of students with frequent or perpetual behavior issues

  • Turn in Tickets by the end of each day to the designated place


Teaching Social/behavioral skills with Integrity - Essential Features Tip Sheet

What does it mean to teach Social/Behavioral Skills with Integrity?

A school-wide approach to teaching social/behavioral skills with integrity is when all staff demonstrates, explain, and practice social/behavioral skills within and across multiple school settings daily. This level of implementation would require all staff in the building to understand their role in teaching social/behavioral skills. Additionally, lessons for each rule on the school’s expectations matrix would be developed and distributed. Giving teachers a direct instruction lesson that addresses non-classroom settings sets the expectation that teaching social/behavioral skills will be a year-long effort.


Why is it Important to Teach Social/Behavioral Skills?

Teaching social/behavioral skills is one of the necessary essential features of the School-wide Positive Behavior Support process. The emphasis on teaching all students important expectations is based on two assumptions: 1) All behavior (both appropriate and inappropriate) is learned, 2) thus appropriate behavior can be taught using the same basic principles with which academic content is taught (Colvin, Sugai & Patching, 1993). Many students who struggle the most with social/behavioral skills have not had an opportunity to learn the social/behavioral skills expected in school. The most efficient approach is to teach social/behavioral skills directly.


What is Direct Instruction of Social/Behavioral Skills?

Direct instruction of social/behavioral skills is when teachers explain exactly what students are expected to learn, and demonstrate the steps needed to accomplish a particular social skill. Direct instruction takes learners through the steps of learning systematically, helping them see both the purpose and the result of each step. Direct instruction is the most efficient method of teaching the social/behavioral skills. “To increase the likelihood of students using social/behavioral skills appropriately across people, places and situations, teaching procedures should include multiple examples, practice within and across multiple settings, instruction on self management skills, and involvement of a variety of people” (Lewis and Sugai, 1999, p. 6).


Steps for Direct Instruction of Social/Behavioral Skills

• Teach students lesson objectives

• Tie to prior knowledge

• Model; show examples

• Role plays positive examples

• Students practice, practice, practice & are given performance feedback

• Make connections with other curricular areas

• When errors occur, re-teach again and again


Are There Ways to Indirectly Teach Social/Behavioral Skills?

After specific social/behavioral skills have been directly taught, it is helpful to give students pre-correct before they are asked to perform the skill. Pre-corrects function as reminders and can be particularly helpful when teachers anticipate students will have difficulty with the skill. A pre-correct example: After students have been directly taught to listen to adult directions, teachers can say after giving an attention signal. “Before we begin, remember the steps to listening to adult directions are eyes on me, voice off and body to self.”

Often there are natural opportunities throughout the day to practice, practice, and practice social/behavioral skills. Practice helps students

• maintain previously learned knowledge

• focus on current lessons

• tie current content with previously learned content

• generalize of skills taught in class to other non-classroom settings

• Identify times and places when it is difficult to use social/behavioral skills they have been taught


What Roles Do Non-classroom staff have to support social/behavioral skills instruction?

• All adults in the building should be fluent with the language of the school-wide expectations (e.g. Leadership, Empathy, Accountability and Determination) and use them when interacting with students.

• All adults in the building should model the behaviors we expect of the students. For example, if students are expected to use quiet, Leadership voices in the hallway, all staff should use quiet, Leadership voices in the hallways too.

• All adults can support students who are using the social/behavioral skills they have been taught by giving students specific and positive feedback. A sincere comment such as, “Thanks for being a leader and moving onto class guys” helps support students’ use of social/behavioral skills they have been taught.

• Corrective interaction focus on re-teaching the expected behavior as any learning error would be taught (Example: What should you be doing? 2. Do you need help doing it? 3. Let me see you do it)



How will we know if adults are teaching PBIS Concepts?

• Adults model expected social/behavioral skills (e.g., walk on the right, voices off in the hallways)

• Teachers make student work visible—posters, stories, goals, and data

• Class schedules include social/behavioral skills lesson time

• Hear staff use expectations language regularly as they give students pre-corrects and performance feedback each day, all day, all year

• The school environment is calm, organized, and positive


Incentive Programs– The “Positive” in PBIS

Student Incentives

“Tickets” Individual Acknowledgement/Reward System

Once appropriate behaviors have been defined and taught, they need to be acknowledged on a regular basis.  Koontz has designed a formal system that rewards positive behaviors. In the “Ticket” System, a ticket may be given to a student by any staff at their discretion, as a tool of encouragement and a student motivator.   The tickets are given to the student for behavior above and beyond what is expected. Teachers will write the student’s name and select which part of the LEAD acronym the student demonstrated.   Students can earn unlimited tichets each day. They cannot be taken away once earned. Students will turn in tickets to classroom teaher who will be responsible for turning them into the grade level box.. Five tickets/names will be drawn from each grade level and announced over the intercom as an additional incentive (homework pass, positive parent contact, sit with a friend at lunch, dress down day). With the last ticket drawn for each grade level, the teacher who gave the ticket will also receive an incentive!  Classroom teachers may also use tickets for individual or group awards.

“Leader Card” Periodic (9 Week) Recognition Program

Digital Leader Cards award students for the first three  9 weeks for academics, accountability, and attendance. Classroom teachers will complete  digital leader card forms that will be sent to students each 9 weeks. There will be three leader card forms sent to students, one for the first three  9 week grading period. Students can earn up to 9 points on their Digital Leader Cards. They must have 6 points to participate in the 9 week LEAD Socials.  PBIS Reps will decide if documented, extenuating circumstances may be reviewed with the committee. Teachers will present to the committee, not parents and/or students.

Leader Card Example


PBIS Tiered Behavior Flow Chart

The flowchart is designed as a guide for Tier I,II & III behaviors and the accountability measures related to those behaviors. Please review this flowchart as needed. All classrooms should have a laminated copy of this flowchart displayed and a teacher copy for quick reference.

PBIS Tiered Behavior Flow Chart Link


References:

Colvin, G., Sugai, G., & Patching, B., (1993). Pre-correction: An instructional approach for managing

Predictable problem behaviors. Intervention in School and Clinic, 28, 143-150.


Lewis, T.J., &Sugai, G. (1999). Effective behavior support: A systems approach to proactive

School wide management. Focus on Exceptional Children, 31(6), 1-17.


Glen Arden Elementary PBIS Plan

W.W. Estes Elementary PBIS Plan

Zodak Casey Middle School – Mt. Vernon, Illinois

www.pbismaryland.org


Additional Resources: (from the Amie Dean Program)

Koontz Resource Toolkit

Behavior Interventions PPT

The Effort Rubric

Multiple Intelligence Inventory

Multiple Intelligence People Search

Student Satisfaction Survey

Amie Dean Resource Kit



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

A Special Thanks to the PBIS 2017-2018 Planning Team

Reginald Bright - Administrator

Chris Cowan - Administrator

Myra Miller-Rice – Counselor/Co-Chair/Parent Representative

Colleen McKay - Counselor/Co-Chair          

Elisha Scales - 5th Representative

Nancy McGowan - 5th Representative  

Leah McMinn - 5th Representative

Ashton Sabato Berger - 6th Representative   

Deborah Passmore - 6th Representative  

Elizabeth Irvin - EC Representative/Parent Representative

Jennifer Attreau - EC Representative

Ginny Ostgaard - EC Representative  

Julianna Crawford - EC Representative

Holly McCurry - UA Representative

Kelly Dietz - Title 1/Parent Representative